Dr Sarah Coall

Sarah graduated from the University of Liverpool in 2012 and has been in Sydney, Australia ever since. Following 3 years in general practice she moved into referral practice. After 3 years working as an Emergency and Critical care clinician and obtaining memberships in the subject, Sarah started an Ophthalmology Internship and then European college of Veterinary ophthalmology (ECVO) residency. Sarah completed her ECVO residency at the Small Animal Specialist Hospital in Sydney and has since moved to ECA as a registrar.

Sarah is passionate about improving clients and patients’ quality of life. She is committed to ensuring clients are well informed and comfortable via her approachability and communication style. Sarah enjoys sharing her love and knowledge of Veterinary Ophthalmology with general practitioners, nurses, students and interns. Her Ophthalmology interests are numerous from fixable ophthalmic conditions to chronic patient management.

Publications:

– Coall SM, Premont JE, Flatz K, Hindley K, Groth A, Billson FM, Clinical, advance imaging data and outcome of inflammatory and neoplastic orbital disease in 81 dogs and 16 cats in Australia (2010-2019) Veterinary Ophthalmology. 2022; 25 (S1): 37-50.

– Abstract presentation at ECVO congress, Antwerp, Belgium, May 2019.

Presentations:

– A retrospective review of clinical data, treatment and outcome of primary glaucoma in Burmese cats in Australia (2010-2021)- —

– Poster presentation ACVO conference September 2021, Prevalence of conjunctival and intraocular bacteria in dogs undergoing phacoemulsification surgery.

– Abstract presentation, ECVO conference, May 2021, Orbital disease in dogs and cats ANZCVS science week, Gold coast, Australia, July 2018

Dr Fernando Martinez-Taboada

Fernando graduated as a veterinarian in Spain and worked for a number of years in small animal practice both in Spain and the UK.

He undertook an internship and a residency in anaesthesia and analgesia at the University of Bristol, and he became an European Specialist in Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia (DipECVAA) in 2010.

Over the years, Fernando has worked in and headed anaesthesia departments in multiple private and university teaching hospitals.

Fernando’s clinical and research interests focus in the management of acute and chronic pain.

Dr Matt Annear

After graduating as a veterinarian at Murdoch University in 2003 Matt went on to complete rotating internships in Virginia and a subsequent residency in Veterinary Ophthalmology at Michigan State University.

Here he completed a Masters of Science as part of a collaborative team alongside researchers from University College London, investigating a common cause of human childhood blindness.

He was awarded diplomate status of the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmology in 2013. Matt has since worked as an Assistant Professor at The Ohio State University and subsequently at a large private referral practice in New Jersey before returning to Sydney with his family.

Matt enjoys teaching and has a particular interest in cataract surgery, corneal reconstructive procedures and glaucoma surgery.

Dr Keely Wilson

Keely is a Board Certified Specialist in Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia.

Keely graduated from Sydney University in 2008 and worked in mixed and emergency practice in Australia and overseas. After completing an equine internship, she stayed in equine referral practice where she developed her love of anaesthesia. Keely started a residency in anaesthesia and analgesia at Murdoch University, training in both the American and European programmes as well as completing two master’s degrees in veterinary Anaesthesia and Veterinary Clinical Studies.

After working in the UK for 18 months both in academia and at a busy referral practice, she has returned to Sydney and works in a number of referral clinics.

She holds memberships in the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists in Anaesthesia and Analgesia and is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Anaesthetists.

Dr Paul McCarthy

Paul graduated with a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from the University of Sydney. Following graduation, Paul completed a multidisciplinary internship at Northside Veterinary Specialists and an ophthalmology internship with the Eye Clinic for Animals.

Paul has an interest in research and has published in four veterinary journals and presented at two Australian veterinary conferences. His current research focuses are in the areas of canine vision loss, vitreoretinal surgery and the ophthalmic anatomy of Australian Marsupials.

Since joining the Eye Clinic for Animals, Paul has also assisted with teaching at University of Sydney for ophthalmology practicals and tutorials.

Paul is currently a resident at the Eye Clinic for Animals and is training to be a veterinary eye specialist.

Presentations:

– Anxiety and depression in dogs with vision loss. Centre for Veterinary Education “What’s behaviour got to do with it? 2021

– What is that eye trying to tell me? Australian Veterinary Association VetFest Conference. 2020

Publications:

– Use of a chronic soft tissue expansion device to facilitate blepharoplasty in a horse with lower lid cicatricial ectropion with a 14 year follow-up. Veterinary Ophthalmology. 2020

– Surgical approach to a nasolacrimal duct atresia in a German Shepherd Puppy. Australian Veterinary Practitioner. 2020

– Progressive visual loss and severe retinal degeneration in a captive Kodiak bear (Ursus arctos mittendorfi). Veterinary Record Case Reports. 2020

– Accidental arterial catheterisation during a maxillary nerve block using a modified infraorbital approach in a dog. Veterinary Record Case Reports. 2020

Dr William Irving

William graduated veterinary science from James Cook University, Townsville, in 2017. He began to have a specialist interest in ophthalmology in his final year of vet school, which grew as years went on. Following university he completed the Queensland Veterinary Specialist rotating internship in 2018 in Brisbane, then 2 years of emergency and critical care work with Pet Emergency and general practice work within Brisbane. During this time as well undertaking several externships in Ophthalmology around Australia.
He then moved to Sydney and worked as an Ophthalmology Intern at Animal Referral Hospital before starting  at Eye Clinic for Animals.

William is currently a registrar at Eye Clinic for Animals, and is in training to become a Veterinary Ophthalmology Specialist.

Publications:

– Irving, William, Paul McCarthy, Benjamin Reynolds, Cameron Whittaker, Kelly Caruso, Jeff Smith, and Matthew Annear. “Superficial keratectomy for the treatment of spontaneous chronic corneal epithelial defects in dogs.” Veterinary Ophthalmology (2024).

– Irving, William M., Kelly Caruso, Matthew J. Annear, Cameron Whittaker, Benjamin D. Reynolds, Paul MG McCarthy, and Jeffrey Smith. “Free labial mucocutaneous graft for eyelid reconstruction in four dogs.” Veterinary Ophthalmology (2024).

– Irving, William, Cameron Whittaker, Kelly Caruso, Benjamin Reynolds, Paul McCarthy, and Jeff Smith. “Bullous keratopathy in a dwarf rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus domesticus).” Journal of Exotic Pet Medicine 47 (2023): 23-26.

– Irving, William, Matthew Annear, Cameron Whittaker, Kelly Caruso, Benjamin Reynolds, Paul McCarthy, and Jeff Smith. “Effect of dexmedetomidine added to retrobulbar blockade with lignocaine and bupivacaine in dogs undergoing enucleation surgery.” Veterinary Ophthalmology 27, no. 2 (2024): 148-157.

– Reynolds, B. D., M. J. Annear, K. A. Caruso, C. J. Whittaker, W. M. Irving, P. M. McCarthy, and J. S. Smith. “Feline distichiasis treated with cryoepilation: A retrospective study of 15 cats (27 eyes).” Veterinary Ophthalmology (2024).

– Reynolds, B. D., H. G. Nagel, E. Perry, C. J. Whittaker, K. A. Caruso, M. J. Annear, W. M. Irving et al. “Ophthalmic findings associated with Australian tick paralysis (holocyclotoxicity) in hospitalized domestic dogs and cats.” Veterinary Ophthalmology (2024).

– Reynolds, B. D., E. Perry, H. G. Nagel, C. J. Whittaker, K. A. Caruso, M. J. Annear, W. M. Irving et al. “Retrospective assessment of ophthalmic disease development in domestic dogs and cats when hospitalised with tick paralysis caused by Ixodes holocyclus.” Australian Veterinary Journal (2024).

– Ranocchia, J., W. Irving, and B. Haase. “Exclusion of previously described variant in LTBP2 for primary glaucoma in Australian Burmese cats.” Animal Genetics 54, no. 5 (2023): 657-658.

– Caruso, Kelly A., Benjamin D. Reynolds, Cameron J. Whittaker, Jeffrey S. Smith, William M. Irving, Paul G. McCarthy, Negar Hamzianpour, and Gladys Boo. “Use of subdermal hyaluronic acid injections and a free labial mucocutaneous graft for the repair of feline eyelid agenesis.” Veterinary Ophthalmology 25, no. 3 (2022): 209-218.

– Reynolds, Benjamin D., Cameron Whittaker, Kelly Caruso, Matthew J. Annear, Negar Hamzianpour, William Irving, Paul MG McCarthy, and Jeffrey S. Smith. “An investigation into the development of qualitative tear film disorders in dogs following cryoepilation for distichiasis.” Veterinary Ophthalmology 26 (2023): 168-172.

Presentations:

– Clinical Outcomes of Empirical Selection of Chloramphenicol and Ofloxacin in the Treatment of Keratomalacia. American College of Veterinary Ophthalmology Conference. 2020

– Effect of dexmedetomidine added to retrobulbar blockade with lignocaine and bupivacaine in dogs undergoing enucleation surgery. American College of Veterinary Ophthalmology Conference. 2021

– Clinical features of primary glaucoma in Australian Burmese cats. Australian College of Veterinary Sciences’ Science Week Conference. 2022

– Canine Eyelid Reconstruction Using a Free Labial Mucocutaneous Graft Following Large Mass Resection. American College of Veterinary Ophthalmology Conference. 2023

– Superficial keratectomy for the treatment of spontaneous chronic corneal epithelial defects (SCCEDs). Australian College of Veterinary Sciences’ Science Week Conference. 2023

Associate Professor Alex Hunyor

A/Prof Alex Hunyor is a retinal specialist with expertise in vitreoretinal surgery and macular disease. He graduated with Honours from Sydney University Medical School in 1990, and trained in ophthalmology at the Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital (RVEEH) in Melbourne. He was awarded both the Cedric Cohen and the Ken Howsam Medals for excellence in the RANZCO examinations, and the RANZCO-ARVO and RANZCO-Sigma Scholarships. He then undertook 3½ years of subspecialty training in medical and surgical retina at RVEEH, the Casey Eye Institute (Portland, Oregon USA) and with Professor JDM Gass at Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN). Alex returned to practice in Sydney in 2000.

Alex is Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and member of the Macular Research Group at the Save Sight Institute, University of Sydney. He is involved in numerous clinical trials for treatment of retinal diseases. He is one of the principal investigators in the Australian Macular Hole Study and the Fight Retinal Blindness project.

He is a member of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Retinal Specialists, Oceania Retina Association, American Academy of Ophthalmology, Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, and the American Society of Retina Specialists (ASRS). He is the Australian international delegate to the ASRS. Alex serves on the Medical Board of the Macular Degeneration Foundation, and is a Governor on the Board of the Sydney Eye Hospital Foundation.

Alex is an examiner for the RANZCO Advanced Clinical Examinations, Chair of the RANZCO Medicare Advisory Committee, and is involved in teaching of local ophthalmic trainees and ophthalmologists as well as participating in education of overseas specialists through the RANZCO International Development Programme. He has received the RANZCO Award for Excellence in Training on 5 occasions. He has given many lectures at local and international scientific meetings, has over 40 peer-reviewed publications, and serves as a reviewer for several ophthalmic journals as well as the Medical Journal of Australia.

Dr Ben Reynolds

Ben graduated as a veterinarian from James Cook University winning numerous academic awards during the degree. Since this time at university, Ben’s interest in ophthalmology saw him undertake externships to veterinary ophthalmology centres across Australia, the UK and the USA. Ben was fortunate enough to win an international scholarship in 2018 to allow him to undertake advanced ophthalmology training at North Carolina State University while working at one of Brisbane’s largest veterinary hospitals.

Ben joined the Eye Clinic for Animals as an intern in January 2019, and completed his ophthalmology residency in 2022. In this time, Ben underwent further training via an externship at the University of California, Davis. Ben has a passion for all aspects of ophthalmic medicine and surgery. Ben has also been assisting in teaching students at the University of Sydney their ophthalmology practicals and tutorials.

Ben is one of the registrars at Eye Clinic for Animals, and is preparing to sit examinations to be recognized as a veterinary ophthalmology specialist.

Presentations:

– Infectious keratitis in horses of North Queensland: ex vivo susceptibility patterns for fungal and bacterial species. Australian College of Veterinary Sciences’ Science Week Conference. 2018

– Advanced Tear Film Analysis: establishing normative data for canine ocular surface analysis diagnostic tests. Australian College of Veterinary Sciences’ Science Week Conference. 2019

– A review of qualitative and quantitative tear film disorders in dogs. Australian Veterinary Association VetFest Conference. 2020

– Using optical coherence tomography to determine anterior segment morphology and morphometry in selected Australian reptile species. American College of Veterinary Ophthalmology Conference. 2020

– An investigation in to the development of qualitative tear film disorders in dogs following cryoepilation for treating distichiasis. American College of Veterinary Ophthalmology Conference. 2021

– Ophthalmic pathologies associated with Australian tick paralysis (holocyclotoxicity) in domestic dogs and cats. American College of Veterinary Ophthalmology Conference. 2022

 

Publications:

– Patient and tumour factors influencing canine mast cell tumour histological grade and mitotic index. Veterinary and Comparative Oncology. 2019

– Surgical approach to a nasolacrimal duct atresia in a German Shepherd Puppy. Australian Veterinary Practitioner. 2020

– Microsporidial stromal keratitis in a cat. Medical Mycology Case Reports. 2020

– Retinal cone photoreceptor distribution of the American Black Bear (Ursus americanus). The Anatomical Record. 2020

– Use of a chronic soft tissue expansion device to facilitate blepharoplasty in a horse with lower lid cicatricial ectropion with a 14 year follow-up. Veterinary Ophthalmology. 2020

– Use of subdermal hyaluronic acid injections and a free labial mucocutaneous graft for the repair of feline eyelid agenesis. Veterinary Ophthalmology. 2021

– Textbook chapter: “Ophthalmology of Marsupials” and “Ophthalmology of Monotremes”. Wild and Exotic Animal Ophthalmology. 2022

– An investigation into the development of qualitative tear film disorders in dogs following cryoepilation for distichiasis. Veterinary Ophthalmology. 2022

Dr Cameron J G Whittaker

Cameron graduated from Sydney University in 1989. After spending time in mixed animal practice he completed an internship at Sydney University in 1992 and the following year commenced a residency in Veterinary Ophthalmology at the University of Florida. He was granted Diplomate status of the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists in 1996. He then worked at the Ohio State University as a visiting Assistant Professor before returning to Australia in 1997 to join Eye Clinic for Animals and providing specialist ophthalmology services to both small and large animals in Sydney and regional areas of NSW.

Cameron also has served the NSW Division of the AVA and currently provides medicine and surgery lectures and practical sessions to Sydney University students. He voluntarily provides services to wildlife at both Sydney and Western Plains Zoos.

Cameron has a special interest in cataract surgery, glaucoma, corneal medicine and surgery, retinal surgery and exotic animal ophthalmology.

Publications:

Veterinary Ophthalmology 3rd edition

Manual of Equine Practice 2nd edition

Veterinary Clinics of North America – Ophthalmology edition

Dr Kelly Caruso

Kelly graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with a Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine in 1997 after completing a Bachelor of Science in Biology from St Joseph’s University in Philadelphia. She then completed internships in Equine Medicine and Surgery, Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, Ophthalmology and Emergency Medicine and Critical Care. Kelly then completed a residency under the tutelage of Professor Seth Koch – one of the founding members of the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists – and was granted Membership of that body in 2007.

Kelly has written numerous papers in international journals and has lectured extensively both in the USA and internationally and won various teaching awards. In 2010 she came to Australia to work in specialist ophthalmology practice.

Publications:
Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, “What Is Your Diagnosis?: Retrobulbar mass in a dog” Vol 221, No.11, December 1, 2002

Presentations:
“Ocular Blastomycosis: Review of the literature and a case report” Presented in Cambridge, England June 2003 and in Coeur D’Alene, Idaho October 2003

“Canine Ocular Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumours: A report of 3 cases with clinical and histologic features and a review of the literature”. Presented in Washington DC October 2004